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Jackie Cruz

Jackie Cruz

114th Congress

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The first session of the 114th Congress enacted into law six out of the 2,616 introduced bills (0.2 percent). Comparatively, the 113th Congress had 1.3 percent of introduced bills enacted into law in the first session. In the second session, the 114th Congress enacted 133 out of 3,159 introduced bills (4.2 percent). Comparatively, the 113th Congress had 7.0 percent of introduced bills enacted into law in the second session.[40][41] For more information pertaining to Speier's voting record in the 114th Congress, please see the below sections.[42]

Economic and fiscal

Trade Act of 2015
See also: The Trans-Pacific Partnership trade deal, 2015

Trade adjustment assistance
Neutral/Abstain On June 12, 2015, the House rejected the trade adjustment assistance (TAA) measure in HR 1314 - Trade Act of 2015 by a vote of 126 to 302. TAA is a federal program providing American workers displaced by foreign trade agreements with job training and services. Although the measure has generally been supported by Democrats in the past, the vote divided the party because it was packaged in a bill featuring the less popular trade promotion authority (TPA). For this reason, even though the two measures were voted on separately, some considered a vote against TAA to be a de facto vote against TPA. Speier was one of only 4 Democrats who did not vote on TAA.[43][44][45]
Trade promotion authority
Neutral/Abstain On June 12, 2015, the House narrowly passed the trade promotion authority (TPA) measure in HR 1314 - Trade Act of 2015 by a vote of 219 to 211. TPA would give the president fast-track authority to negotiate trade agreements sent to Congress without the opportunity for amendment or filibuster. Speier was one of three Democrats who did not vote on the measure. Although the House approved TPA, it was a largely symbolic vote given the measure was part of a package trade bill including trade adjustment assistance (TAA), which had been rejected earlier the same day.[46][47][48]
Trade promotion authority second vote
Nay3.png After the House failed to pass trade adjustment assistance (TAA) and trade promotion authority (TPA) together on June 12, 2015, it voted to authorize TPA alone as an amendment to HR 2146 - Defending Public Safety Employees' Retirement Act on June 18, 2015. The amendment passed by a vote of 218-208, with all voting members of the House maintaining his or her original position on TPA except for Ted Yoho (R-Fla.). Speier was one of 158 Democrats to vote against the amendment.[49][50]
Trade adjustment assistance second vote
Yea3.png The House passed HR 1295 - Trade Preferences Extension Act of 2015 on June 25, 2015, by a vote of 286-138. The Senate packaged trade adjustment assistance (TAA) in this bill after the House had rejected the TAA measure in HR 1314 - Trade Act of 2015. Along with trade promotion authority (TPA), which Congress passed as part of HR 2146 - Defending Public Safety Employees' Retirement Act, TAA became law on June 29, 2015. Speier was one of 175 Democrats to vote in favor of HR 1295.[51][52]

Defense spending authorization

Nay3.png On May 15, 2015, the House passed HR 1735 - National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2016 by a vote of 269-151. The bill "authorizes FY2016 appropriations and sets forth policies for Department of Defense (DOD) programs and activities, including military personnel strengths. It does not provide budget authority, which is provided in subsequent appropriations legislation." Speier voted with 142 other Democrats and 8 Republicans against the bill.[53] The Senate passed the bill on June 18, 2015, by a vote of 71-25. President Barack Obama vetoed the bill on October 22, 2015.[54]

Yea3.png On November 5, 2015, the House passed S 1356 - the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2016 by a vote of 370-58. The second version of the 7 billion national defense bill included " billion in cuts to match what was approved in the budget" and language preventing the closure of the Guantanamo Bay military prison.[55][56] Speier voted with 134 other Democrats and 235 Republicans to approve the bill.[57] On November 10, 2015, the Senate passed the bill by a vote of 91-3, and President Barack Obama signed it into law on November 25, 2015.[58]

2016 Budget proposal

Nay3.png On April 30, 2015, the House voted to approve SConRes11, a congressional budget proposal for fiscal year 2016, by a vote of 226-197. The non-binding resolution will be used to create 12 appropriations bills to fund the government. All 183 Democrats who voted, including Speier, voted against the resolution.[59][60][61]

2015 budget

Yea3.png On October 28, 2015, the House passed HR 1314 - Bipartisan Budget Act of 2015 by a vote of 266-167. The bill increased military and domestic spending levels and suspended the debt ceiling until March 2017.[62] Speier voted with 186 Democrats and 79 Republicans in favor of the bill.[63] It passed the Senate on October 30, 2015.[64] President Barack Obama signed it into law on November 2, 2015.

Foreign Affairs

Iran nuclear deal
See also: Iran nuclear agreement, 2015

Yea3.png On May 14, 2015, the House approved HR 1191 - the Iran Nuclear Agreement Review Act of 2015 by a vote of 400-25. The bill required President Barack Obama to submit the details of the nuclear deal with Iran for congressional review. Congress had 60 days to review the deal and vote to approve, disapprove or take no action on the deal. During the review period, sanctions on Iran could not be lifted. Speier voted with 176 Democrats to approve the bill.[65][66]


Approval of Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action
Yea3.png On September 11, 2015, the House rejected HR 3461 - To approve the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action, signed at Vienna on July 14, 2015, relating to the nuclear program of Iran by a vote of 162-269. The legislation proposed approving the nuclear agreement with Iran. Speier voted with 161 Democrats for the bill.[67][68]


Suspension of Iran sanctions relief
Nay3.png On September 11, 2015, the House approved HR 3460 - To suspend until January 21, 2017, the authority of the President to waive, suspend, reduce, provide relief from, or otherwise limit the application of sanctions pursuant to an agreement related to the nuclear program of Iran by a vote of 247-186. HR 3460 prohibits "the President, prior to January 21, 2017, from: limiting the application of specified sanctions on Iran or refraining from applying any such sanctions; or removing a foreign person (including entities) listed in Attachments 3 or 4 to Annex II of the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action (JCPA) from the list of designated nationals and blocked persons maintained by the Office of Foreign Asset Control of the Department of the Treasury." Speier voted with 185 Democrats against the bill.[69][70]


Presidential non-compliance of section 2
Nay3.png On September 10, 2015, the House passed H Res 411 - Finding that the President has not complied with section 2 of the Iran Nuclear Agreement Review Act of 2015 by a vote of 245-186. Section 2 of the Iran Nuclear Agreement Review Act of 2015 required the president to submit all materials related to the nuclear agreement for congressional review. House Republicans introduced the resolution because two agreements between the International Atomic Energy Agency and Iran were not submitted to Congress. Speier voted with 185 Democrats against the resolution.[71][72]

Export-Import Bank

Yea3.png On October 27, 2015, the House passed HR 597 - the Export-Import Bank Reform and Reauthorization Act of 2015 by a vote of 313-118. The bill proposes reauthorizing the Export-Import Bank and allowing it to resume offering assistance in the form of loans and insurance to foreign companies that want to buy U.S. goods.[73] Speier voted with 185 Democrats and 127 Republicans in favor of the bill.[74]

Domestic

USA FREEDOM Act of 2015

Yea3.png On May 13, 2015, the House passed HR 2048 - the Uniting and Strengthening America by Fulfilling Rights and Ensuring Effective Discipline Over Monitoring Act of 2015 or the USA FREEDOM Act of 2015 by a vote of 338-88. The legislation revised HR 3199 - the USA PATRIOT Improvement and Reauthorization Act of 2005 by terminating the bulk collection of metadata under Sec. 215 of the act, increasing transparency of the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court and requiring the use of "a specific selection term as the basis for national security letters that request information from wire or electronic communication service providers, financial institutions, or consumer reporting agencies." Speier voted with 141 Democrats and 196 Republicans to approve the legislation. It became law on June 2, 2015.[75][76]

Pain-Capable Unborn Child Protection Act

Nay3.png On May 13, 2015, the House passed HR 36 - the Pain-Capable Unborn Child Protection Act by a vote of 242-184. The bill proposes prohibiting abortions from being performed after an unborn child is determined to be 20 weeks or older. If a woman's life is in danger or her pregnancy is the result of rape or incest which has been reported to law enforcement or an appropriate government agency at any time, an abortion may be performed. Speier voted with 179 Democrats against the bill. The vote largely followed party lines.[77][78]

Cyber security

Neutral/Abstain On April 23, 2015, the House passed HR 1731 - the National Cybersecurity Protection Advancement Act of 2015 by a vote of 355-63. The bill proposes creating an information sharing program that will allow federal agencies and private entities to share information about cyber threats and includes liability protections for companies.[79] Speier and eight other Democrats did not vote.[80]

Yea3.png On April 22, 2015, the House passed HR 1560 - the Protecting Cyber Networks Act by a vote of 307-116.[81] The bill proposes procedures that will allow federal agencies and private entities to share information about cyber threats. Speier voted with 104 Democrats and 202 Republicans in favor of the bill.[82]

Immigration

Nay3.png On November 19, 2015, the House passed HR 4038 - the American SAFE Act of 2015 by a vote of 289-137.[83] The bill proposes instituting a stronger screening process for refugees from Iraq and Syria who apply for admission to the U.S. Speier voted with 134 Democrats and two Republicans against the bill.[84]

113th Congress

The second session of the 113th Congress enacted into law 224 out of the 3215 introduced bills (7 percent). Comparatively, the 112th Congress had 4.2 percent of introduced bills enacted into law in the second session.[85] For more information pertaining to Speier's voting record in the 113th Congress, please see the below sections.[86]

National security

NDAA

Nay3.png Speier voted against HR 1960 - the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2014. The bill passed the House on June 14, 2013, with a vote of 315 - 108. Both parties were somewhat divided on the vote.[87]

DHS Appropriations

Nay3.png Speier voted against HR 2217 - the DHS Appropriations Act of 2014. The bill passed the House on June 6, 2013, with a vote of 245 - 182 that was largely along party lines.[88]

CISPA (2013)

Nay3.png Speier voted against HR 624 - the CISPA (2013). The bill passed the House on April 18, 2013, with a vote of 288 - 127. The bill permitted federal intelligence agencies to share cybersecurity intelligence and information with private entities and utilities. The bill was largely supported by Republicans, but divided the Democratic Party.[89]

Economy

Farm bill

Nay3.png On January 29, 2014, the U.S. House approved the Federal Agriculture Reform and Risk Management Act of 2013, H.R. 2642, known as the Farm Bill.[90] The bill passed by a vote of 251-166. The nearly 1,000-page bill provides for the reform and continuation of agricultural and other programs of the Department of Agriculture through 2018. The trillion bill expanded crop insurance for farmers by billion over the next decade and created new subsidies for rice and peanut growers that would kick in when prices drop.[91][92] However, cuts to the food stamp program cut an average of per month for 1.7 million people in 15 states.[92] Speier voted with 102 other Democratic representatives against the bill.

2014 Budget

Yea3.png On January 15, 2014, the Republican-run House approved H.R. 3547, a .1 trillion spending bill to fund the government through September 30, 2014.[93][94] The House voted 359-67 for the 1,582 page bill, with 64 Republicans and three Democrats voting against the bill.[94] The omnibus package included 12 annual spending bills to fund federal operations.[95] It included a 1 percent increase in the paychecks of federal workers and military personnel, a billion increase in Head Start funding for early childhood education, reduced funding to the Internal Revenue Service and the Environmental Protection Agency, and the protection of the Affordable Care Act from any drastic cuts. Speier joined with the majority of the Democratic party and voted in favor of the bill.[93][94]

Government shutdown

See also: United States budget debate, 2013

Nay3.png On September 30, 2013, the House passed a final stopgap spending bill before the shutdown went into effect. The bill included a one-year delay of the Affordable Care Act's individual mandate and would have also stripped the bill of federal subsidies for congressional members and staff. It passed through the House with a vote of 228-201.[96] At 1 a.m. on October 1, 2013, one hour after the shutdown officially began, the House voted to move forward with going to a conference. In short order, Sen. Harry Reid rejected the call to conference.[97] Speier voted against the stopgap spending bill that would have delayed the individual mandate.[98]

Yea3.png The shutdown ended on October 16, 2013, when the House took a vote on HR 2775 after it was approved by the Senate. The bill to reopen the government lifted the .7 trillion debt limit and funded the government through January 15, 2014. Federal employees also received retroactive pay for the shutdown period. The only concession made by Senate Democrats was to require income verification for Obamacare subsidies.[99] The House passed the legislation shortly after the Senate, by a vote of 285-144, with all 144 votes against the legislation coming from Republican members. Speier voted for HR 2775.[100]

Federal Pay Adjustment Elimination

Neutral/Abstain Speier did not vote on HR 273 - Eliminates the 2013 Statutory Pay Adjustment for Federal Employees. The bill passed the House on February 15, 2013, with a vote of 261 - 154. The bill called for a stop to a 0.5 percent pay increase for all federal workers from taking effect, saving the federal government billion over 10 years.[101]

Immigration

Morton Memos Prohibition

Nay3.png Speier voted against House Amendment 136 - Prohibits the Enforcement of the Immigration Executive Order. The amendment was adopted by the House on June 6, 2013, with a vote of 224 - 201. The purpose of the amendment as stated on the official text is to "prohibit the use of funds to finalize, implement, administer, or enforce the Morton Memos." These memos would have granted administrative amnesty to certain illegal aliens residing in the United States.[102] The vote largely followed party lines.[103]

Healthcare

Health Care Reform Rules

Nay3.png Speier voted against House Amendment 450 - Requires Congressional Approval for Any Rules Under the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act. The amendment was adopted by the House on August 2, 2013, with a vote of 227-185. The amendment requires that all changes to the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act be approved by Congress before taking effect. The vote was largely along party lines.[104]

Social issues

Abortion

Nay3.png Speier voted against HR 1797 - Pain-Capable Unborn Child Protection Act. The resolution passed the House on June 18, 2013, with a vote of 228 - 196 that largely followed party lines. The purpose of the bill was to ban abortions that would take place 20 or more weeks after fertilization.[105]

Previous congressional sessions

Fiscal Cliff

Yea3.png Speier voted for the fiscal cliff compromise bill, which made permanent most of the Bush tax cuts originally passed in 2001 and 2003 while also raising tax rates on the highest income levels. She was 1 of 172 Democrats that voted in favor of the bill. The bill was passed in the House by a 257 - 167 vote on January 1, 2013.[106]




Jackie Cruz photos

Jackie Cruz photos

Jackie Cruz photos

Jackie Cruz photos

Jackie Cruz photos

Jackie Cruz photos

Jackie Cruz photos

Jackie Cruz photos